Crochet the Rolled Double Crochet Stitch

Final result-- Supplies
Any Size Yarn - Recommended Hook Size - Split Ring Stitch Markers (Optional)
*Please don't confuse the "rolled" double crochet with the "roll" stitch, which is also known as the "bullion" stitch. To practice this stitch, you can use any yarn you are comfortable with, and the manufacturer's recommended hook size.*Please don't confuse the "rolled" double crochet with the "roll" stitch, which is also known as the "bullion" stitch. To practice this stitch, you can use any yarn you are comfortable with, and the manufacturer's recommended hook size.
Begin by chaining your desired amount of stitches, and start with a row of double crochet (dc).
To make a dc, yarn over (y/o).
Insert hook in the next stitch.Pull up a loop. (3 loops on hook)
Y/o, pull through 2 loops on the hook. (2 loops left on hook)Y/o, pull through 2 remaining loops. (1 dc complete)
Finish the beginning row of dc and turn your work.Insert hook in the current stitch, from back to front.
Insert the hook in the stitch below, from front to back. You will be working into the same stitch that the current stitch was made in. This is will be easier when working into the beginning chain (ch).Pull up a loop from behind your work. (2 loops on hook) Keep this stitch snug against the back of the work. You don't want to pull up extra length, or you'll just be making a regular "long" stitch. Let the stitch underneath it fold over.
Pull the first stitch on the hook through the second stitch for a slip st (sl st).Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc) to make the height of the next stitch.
Y/o, insert hook from back to front in the next stitch, then from front to back in the stitch below.Pull up a loop (3 loops on hook)
(Y/o, pull through 2 loops) twice to finish the dc.Repeat Steps 14 through 16 for each remaining stitch. Don't lose your last stitch (the turning ch) when you make the second to last stitch! It helps to hold on to this stitch while working the last 2 stitches.
When working this pattern, it can be extra difficult to find your turning chain and its corresponding stitch underneath. You can use a stitch marker to help you find the top of the dc, and you can easily find the bottom stitch next to the last bottom stitch you worked into.If you would like to practice a double-thick, double-sided stitch, continue following along. If you want to start out with a more simple ribbed pattern, you can skip to Step 25.
For a double-thick stitch, you will now work into the top loops of the last row, and the same bottom loops as the first 2 rows. This means you will be working over 2 rows of dc. Turn your work and insert the hook from back to front in the current stitch. Insert hook in the same bottom loop from front to back. Pull up a loop from the back of your work.
Pull through the loop on the hook for a sl st. Remember to ch 3 to count as the first dc.Yarn over, insert hook in the top of the next st from back to front, then into the stitch below from front to back. Pull up a loop. (Y/o, pull through 2 loops) twice to complete the dc.* Repeat from * to * for each remaining stitch. Notice how the pattern will begin to take on more texture, and you can see how the top loop of the stitch you are working into falls to the front.
You can't continue working this way, because the new stitches are going into the same stitches as the previous row. Eventually, you need to make a new row of regular dc.Make one row of regular dc in the tops of the stitches from the previous row.
To continue with a one-sided ribbed pattern, begin making another row of rolled dc. Insert the hook from back to front in the top of the current stitch, then insert the hook in the stitch below, from front to back. Make sure you insert the hook in the bottom stitch only, and not into the top loops of the stitch in the row below. Sl st, ch 3 (counts as first dc).
You can see that when you continue with the pattern, it is a bit more difficult to find the bottom stitch. It's also very easy to accidentally catch other stitches with the hook while you try to pick up your working yarn.If the stitch is done properly, you will see a rib pop up from below the bottom of current stitch, and a rib will pop up directly below the top of the stitch.
When done properly, these raised stitches will be in a straight line across your work. With the one-sided ribbed pattern, you will also see how the tops of the current row's stitches come out from under the previous row.The back of the work will be flat.
The ribs only pop out to the front. The pattern will remain one-sided as long as you make an odd number (1 ,3, 5...) of regular dc rows in between the rolled dc rows.If you crochet an even number (2, 4, 6...) of regular dc in between, you will have ribs pop out on the back side of the work, too.
This pattern can be used to add texture to a flat crochet piece. It also works great for transitioning between working a flat pattern to working vertically. This is helpful for items such as bags and baskets worked in the round. It creates an extra-strength stitch around the bottom of the pattern, while turning the tops of the stitches up to continue working vertically. source 

No comments :

Post a Comment